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Half of Car Owners Would Pay $8 Monthly to Protect Vehicle from Hacking

Răzvan MUREȘAN

August 06, 2015

Half of Car Owners Would Pay $8 Monthly to Protect Vehicle from Hacking

Some 52% of drivers would pay a monthly subscription to ensure their vehicle is completely protected from hacking, with $8 being the average amount paid each month, according to the Vehicle Hacking Vulnerability Survey by Kelley Blue Book.

The recent Jeep Cherokee hacking incident, and the headlines spotlighting vulnerabilities of vehicle hacking have raised awareness of car owners and shoppers. Nearly 80% say it will be a common problem within three years or less, the authors of the study found.

Some 58% think there will never be a permanent solution to vehicle hacking. About 41% think pranking is the most common reason to hack a vehicle, and 37% think theft is the most common.

More than 80% think the manufacturer is most responsible to secure a vehicle from hacking, and most would prefer a security patch installed at a dealership right away, the study shows. Only 11% consider themselves most responsible to secure a vehicle from hacking, and 5% see it as the responsibility of their wireless provider.

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“Cyber-security is still a relatively new area of specialization for automakers, but it’s one they need to take seriously to ensure they are ahead of the curve,” said Karl Brauer, senior analyst for Kelley Blue Book. “If automotive engineers find themselves playing catch-up in this field, it could have disastrous results for both consumers and the industry.”

The Security and Privacy in Your Car (SPY) Act of 2015 proposed this July in the US Senate could force automakers to update software more, isolate critical systems from the car’s internal network and clearly state data collection practices, according to HOTforSecurity. It would be the world’s first automotive cyber-security law that may force automakers to deliver software updates and stop vehicle tracking as part of new IT security standards regarding connected cars in the US.

Kelley Blue Book fielded the Vehicle Hacking Vulnerability Survey from July 24 – 27, with 1,134 respondents.

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